Pratt Sustainability Registration Options for Spring 2015

Pratt_DeKalbThe Spring 2015 offering of SUST 401-01 Power, Pollution, and Profit has filled to capacity, but other options remain for Pratt students interested in taking sustainability-related coursework from the Department of Social Science and Cultural Studies. (There are also options in other departments; discuss them with your academic advisor.)

I am leading a team of Pratt Institute faculty teaching SUST 201 The Sustainable Core, which remains open for registration.  This course is designed as our introduction to sustainability, is the required core course for Pratt’s Sustainability Studies minor, and is an excellent way to get familiar with the many ways sustainability is practiced at Pratt.

SUST 201-01 The Sustainable Core
This course provides an overview of sustainability by exploring definitions, controversies, trends, and case-studies in various systems and locales (urban/rural, local/national/global). Investigation of critical elements of sustainability, including environmental history and urban ecology, sustainable development and landscape transformations, recycling/waste management, ecosystem restoration, and environmental justice.

Spring 2015: Mondays, 2pm-4:50pm.  3 credit hours.

In addition, Assistant Professor Jennifer Telesca (Pratt’s newest Sustainability faculty member) has two new special topics courses of interest.  The first is SS 490-15 Environmental Justice, offered Thursdays from 2-4:50pm. While aspects of EJ are covered in SUST 201, SUST 401, and SUST 405, this seminar gives students the opportunity to have in-depth discussions of equity issues relating to the environment.

Jen Telesca is also teaching two sections of The Human-Animal Relationship. SS 490-21 is offered Tuesdays from 2-4:50pm and SS 490-22 is offered Wednesdays from 9:30am-12:30pm.

Eric Godoy is teaching PHIL 356-01 Environmental Ethics Mondays from 5-7:50pm. In addition to being an elective for the minor, PHIL 356 discussions relate closely to themes of each of the courses described above.

There are no prerequisites for any of these courses. If you are a Pratt student and have any questions for me about these courses (or about the Sustainability Studies minor), please feel free to contact me at czimring@pratt.edu.

Pratt Spring 2015 Course Registration Update

How do humans live in concert with the environment?  Discuss this question in these two Fall 2013 courses.

An update on the two Sustainability courses I am teaching next semester.  Each of these courses may count as a Social Science or Philosophy elective, each may count to satisfy credits in the Sustainability Studies minor, and there are no prerequisites for either of them.  All Pratt undergraduates are eligible and encouraged to enroll.

SUST 401-01 Power, Pollution, and Profit has filled to capacity, but I am also leading a team of Pratt Institute faculty teaching SUST 201 The Sustainable Core, which remains open for registration.  This course is designed as our introduction to sustainability, is the required core course for Pratt’s Sustainability Studies minor, and is an excellent way to get familiar with the many ways sustainability is practiced at Pratt.

SUST 201-01 The Sustainable Core
This course provides an overview of sustainability by exploring definitions, controversies, trends, and case-studies in various systems and locales (urban/rural, local/national/global). Investigation of critical elements of sustainability, including environmental history and urban ecology, sustainable development and landscape transformations, recycling/waste management, ecosystem restoration, and environmental justice.

Spring 2015: Mondays, 2pm-4:50pm.  3 credit hours.

Both of these courses may count as a Social Science or Philosophy elective, and there are no prerequisites for either of them. If you are a Pratt student and have any questions for me about these courses (or about the Sustainability Studies minor), please feel free to contact me at czimring@pratt.edu.

Pratt Spring 2015 Course Registration Update

How do humans live in concert with the environment?  Discuss this question in these two Fall 2013 courses.

An update on the two Sustainability courses I am teaching next semester.  Each of these courses may count as a Social Science or Philosophy elective, each may count to satisfy credits in the Sustainability Studies minor, and there are no prerequisites for either of them.  All Pratt undergraduates are eligible and encouraged to enroll.

One of these courses focuses on how we power the processes that allow us to create and distribute goods, as well as transport ourselves and enjoy the conveniences of modern life.  We will discuss global climate change, nuclear power, and fracking (among other topics) in SUST 401-01 Power, Pollution, and Profit.  As of this morning, eight seats are still available in the seminar.

SUST 401-01 Power, Pollution, and Profit
Modern society relies on burning fossil fuel for energy, with serious economic, public health, and environmental consequences. Learn the history of how we came to rely on unsustainable energy sources and ways In which our future use of energy may be made mode sustainable.

Spring 2015: Tuesdays, 2pm-4:50pm.  3 credit hours.

I am also leading a team of Pratt Institute faculty teaching SUST 201 The Sustainable Core, which remains open for registration.  This course is designed as our introduction to sustainability, is the required core course for Pratt’s Sustainability Studies minor, and is an excellent way to get familiar with the many ways sustainability is practiced at Pratt.

SUST 201-01 The Sustainable Core
This course provides an overview of sustainability by exploring definitions, controversies, trends, and case-studies in various systems and locales (urban/rural, local/national/global). Investigation of critical elements of sustainability, including environmental history and urban ecology, sustainable development and landscape transformations, recycling/waste management, ecosystem restoration, and environmental justice.

Spring 2015: Mondays, 2pm-4:50pm.  3 credit hours.

Both of these courses may count as a Social Science or Philosophy elective, and there are no prerequisites for either of them. If you are a Pratt student and have any questions for me about these courses (or about the Sustainability Studies minor), please feel free to contact me at czimring@pratt.edu.

Register for Spring 2015 Sustainability Courses at Pratt

How do humans live in concert with the environment?  Discuss this question in these two Fall 2013 courses.

I am offering two Sustainability courses next semester.  Each of these courses may count as a Social Science or Philosophy elective, each may count to satisfy credits in the Sustainability Studies minor, and there are no prerequisites for either of them.  All Pratt undergraduates are eligible and encouraged to enroll.

One of these courses focuses on how we power the processes that allow us to create and distribute goods, as well as transport ourselves and enjoy the conveniences of modern life.  If you are concerned about global climate change, nuclear power, or tracking, consider registering in SUST 401-01 Power, Pollution, and Profit.  The seminar examines the ways industrial society has harnessed energy, what the consequences of our past and present energy uses are, and how we might develop more sustainable practices involving energy.  Here’s a quick summary:

SUST 401-01 Power, Pollution, and Profit
Modern society relies on burning fossil fuel for energy, with serious economic, public health, and environmental consequences. Learn the history of how we came to rely on unsustainable energy sources and ways In which our future use of energy may be made mode sustainable.

Spring 2015: Tuesdays, 2pm-4:50pm.  3 credit hours.

In addition to that seminar, I am leading a team of Pratt Institute faculty teaching SUST 201 The Sustainable Core.  This course is designed as our introduction to sustainability, is the required core course for Pratt’s Sustainability Studies minor, and is an excellent way to get familiar with the many ways sustainability is practiced at Pratt.

SUST 201-01 The Sustainable Core
This course provides an overview of sustainability by exploring definitions, controversies, trends, and case-studies in various systems and locales (urban/rural, local/national/global). Investigation of critical elements of sustainability, including environmental history and urban ecology, sustainable development and landscape transformations, recycling/waste management, ecosystem restoration, and environmental justice.

Spring 2015: Mondays, 2pm-4:50pm.  3 credit hours.

Both of these courses may count as a Social Science or Philosophy elective, and there are no prerequisites for either of them. If you are a Pratt student and have any questions for me about these courses (or about the Sustainability Studies minor), please feel free to contact me at czimring@pratt.edu.

Discussing Industrialized Waterways at the Society for the History of Technology Conference This Week

A man stands upon waste on Bubbly Creek, 1911.  Chicago Daily News.

A man stands upon waste on Bubbly Creek, 1911. Chicago Daily News.

The Society for the History of Technology (SHOT) meeting is in Dearborn, Michigan this week. The Envirotech Special Interest Group (SIG) always has a presence at SHOT, and as part of it, I will present a talk about the use of environmental history to develop sustainability studies education at 2pm Friday. Although this talk is right after lunch, it will probably include the image of a man standing atop slaughterhouse waste on Chicago’s Bubbly Creek. Audience members are advised to eat Coney Island hot dogs for lunch at their peril. Here’s the panel information.

Technology Natures Communication (Friday, 2-3:30pm)

Carl Zimring (Pratt Institute): Is the Polluted Past Prologue to a Sustainable Future? Uses of the Environmental History of Waterways as Pedagogy for Sustainability Education

Ann N. Greene (University of Pennsylvania): Engineering the Erie: The Technopolitics of Water in 19th Century America

Michael Winslow (University of Iowa): The Culture of Turfgrass: Golf Tourism, Progressive Agriculture, and Technologies of Landscape in North Carolina, 1895–1935

Scratchy

Erin "Scratchy" Hutter (at left), Tom Moran, Stephanie Vargo, and a profile shot of Erin Snyder.

Erin “Scratchy” Hutter (at left), Tom Moran, Stephanie Vargo, and a profile shot of Erin Snyder.

Tonight is Halloween, putting me in mind of past Halloween celebrations. Some of the most fun ones I’ve had were spent in Pittsburgh at the end of the last century, when a few of us led by Tom and Stephanie of the Deliberate Strangers organized three annual music festivals: Twangburgh (in 1998) and the Haunted Hillbilly Hoedown (in 1999 and 2000). All three featured the Deliberate Strangers, as well as  kindred spirits ranging from locals Coal Train and the Polish Hillbillies to national acts such as Jon Langford, the Drive-By Truckers, Dirtball, and Hazel Dickens. They were a lot of work, but also a delight to experience both for the music and camaraderie.

Scratchy with her fiddle and  Slim Forsythe.

Scratchy with her fiddle and Slim Forsythe.

Erin “Scratchy” Hutter was a big part of these festivities. If you’ve listened to much music in Pittsburgh over the past twenty years, there’s a good chance you’ve enjoyed Scratchy play her violin, make spooky noises on her theremin, or contribute harmony vocals somewhere. Her tastes ran from traditional country to Nick Cave, evident in her black wardrobe and the variety of her bands. I first saw Scratchy play with the Deliberate Strangers opening for Robbie Fulks (at a sports bar in Shadyside, of all places), and over the years got to hear her play many shows with the Strangers, as well as alt.rock aggregation Boxstep and electric string quartet EQ (with namesake Erin Snyder) before I moved away in 2003. Scratchy sweetened the sound of all of these bands, and was generally a supportive part of the scene. Whether it was expressing concern for a concertgoer who had over-imbibed, or training with me at WRCT so she could showcase music from local bands, Scratchy made things better for the people around her.

Scratchy died earlier this week at the far too early age of 48. Services are set for tomorrow morning, All Saints’ Day. I will always think of her at Halloween.

Here’s a clip of her, Erin Snyder, and Slim Forsythe playing “Will the Circle Be Unbroken” from last year.  Undertaker, please drive slow.

Whose Waste? Whose Problem?

PlasticBagsChicagoI’m in Munich this week for the interdisciplinary workshop Whose Waste? Whose Problem?

Conveners: Eveline Dürr (LMU), Soraya Heuss (LMU), Roman Koster (LMU), and Christof Mauch (LMU/RCC)

Waste has until now mainly been a technical problem, matched by technical solutions in waste disposal, waste management, and recycling. But waste is a complex phenomenon that can only be fully understood by exploring cultural perceptions and social practices alongside the technical strategies for dealing with waste. A broader view helps us to focus more clearly on the political topicality of waste, for instance in the context of the fast-growing megacities. It is all the more surprising, therefore, that there has not yet been any systematic research into the social, legal, and political discussions about waste in the light of modern developments.

This three-day workshop, as part of the LMU Center for Advanced Studies research focus ‘Waste in Environment and Society,’ features presentations by leading scholars on ‘waste-scapes,’ how waste travels, and the possibility of a future without waste.

Presenters include:

  • Catherine Alexander (Anthropologist, University of Durham)
  • Amanda Boetzkes (Art Historian, Ohio State University)
  • Kate Brown (Historian, University of Maryland, Baltimore)
  • Christian Felske (City of Edmonton, Waste Management Services)
  • Stefania Gallini (Historian, Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Bogotá)
  • Zsuzsa Gille (Sociologist, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign)
  • Jutta Gutberlet (Geographer, University of Victoria)
  • Sarah Hill (Anthropologist, Western Michigan University)
  • Herbert Köpnik (Formerly from Bavarian Ministry for Environment and Health)
  • Martin Melosi (Historian, University of Houston)
  • Jorge Fernández Niello (Environmental Engineer, Universidad Nacional de San Martín)
  • Gerhard Rettenberger (Engineer, Hochschule Trier)
  • Vera Susanne Rottner (Engineer, Waste Management)
  • Djahane Salehabadi (Sociologist)
  • John Scanlan (Sociologist, Manchester Metropolitan University)
  • Tian Song (Philosophy/Sociology, Beijing Normal University)
  • Carl Zimring (Environmental Historian, Pratt Institute)