Category Archives: teaching

Tenure-Track Interdisciplinary Environmental Positions at Two Schools

Two of my erstwhile academic departments have tenure-track positions available. I can vouch for both places having great colleagues. They are distinctly different campuses (one in Chicago’s South Loop, the other in the northernmost part of Michigan’s Upper Peninsula), but both are excellent places to research and teach environmental social sciences.

Before I moved to Pratt in 2012, I helped found the Sustainability Studies program at Roosevelt University in Chicago. RU is looking for a sustainability scholar with a social science background (sustainability, urban planning, environmental studies, or a related field in the social sciences). The deadline for applying is January 5, 2015. You can see full details about the position at the link; here is an extended description of the job:

Roosevelt University is seeking an Assistant Professor of Sustainability Studies for a tenure-track position beginning 15 August 2015. Applicants should have the ability to teach multiple courses in the Sustainability Studies (SUST) undergraduate curriculum as well as general education, honors, and/or special topic courses related to their areas of expertise. Teaching load is six courses per year. Courses are offered at Roosevelt’s Chicago campus as well as online.

Duties: (1) Teaching courses within the SUST major as well as one or two courses per year in an appropriate academic department within the College of Arts and Sciences. (2) Assisting with SUST program development through curriculum enhancement and assessment, service learning project development, community outreach, and online social media writing. (3) Maintaining an active scholarly research program within one’s primary academic discipline(s) and/or the emerging field of sustainability studies. (4) Advising undergraduate students. (5) Performing departmental, college, university, and professional service.

My first job out of grad school was a one-year position in Michigan Technological University’s Department of Social Sciences. Although there’s been natural turnover in the department since I left over ten years ago, it continues to attract some of the best scholars in STS, environmental history, and industrial archaeology. The campus is located in Houghton, a short drive from the northernmost point in the Upper Peninsula. It is an excellent location for cross-country skiing, hiking (including on nearby Isle Royale), and wildlife sighting. In our third month at Michigan Tech, Jen and I saw a black bear cross the road in front of us. (The bear was not in Houghton, but on the road to Marquette. Wildlife in town is considerably less intimidating. You should, however, be prepared for snow.)

Michigan Tech is searching for an assistant professor “specializing in environmental justice, industrial communities/deindustrialization, health, food systems, or gender.” Click the link for the full job description. Review of applications begins January 15, 2015.

Clicking through the links will give prospective candidates an idea of the people, courses, and projects of these two programs. I encourage qualified people to apply.

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Pratt Spring 2015 Course Registration Update

How do humans live in concert with the environment?  Discuss this question in these two Fall 2013 courses.

An update on the two Sustainability courses I am teaching next semester.  Each of these courses may count as a Social Science or Philosophy elective, each may count to satisfy credits in the Sustainability Studies minor, and there are no prerequisites for either of them.  All Pratt undergraduates are eligible and encouraged to enroll.

SUST 401-01 Power, Pollution, and Profit has filled to capacity, but I am also leading a team of Pratt Institute faculty teaching SUST 201 The Sustainable Core, which remains open for registration.  This course is designed as our introduction to sustainability, is the required core course for Pratt’s Sustainability Studies minor, and is an excellent way to get familiar with the many ways sustainability is practiced at Pratt.

SUST 201-01 The Sustainable Core
This course provides an overview of sustainability by exploring definitions, controversies, trends, and case-studies in various systems and locales (urban/rural, local/national/global). Investigation of critical elements of sustainability, including environmental history and urban ecology, sustainable development and landscape transformations, recycling/waste management, ecosystem restoration, and environmental justice.

Spring 2015: Mondays, 2pm-4:50pm.  3 credit hours.

Both of these courses may count as a Social Science or Philosophy elective, and there are no prerequisites for either of them. If you are a Pratt student and have any questions for me about these courses (or about the Sustainability Studies minor), please feel free to contact me at czimring@pratt.edu.

Pratt Spring 2015 Course Registration Update

How do humans live in concert with the environment?  Discuss this question in these two Fall 2013 courses.

An update on the two Sustainability courses I am teaching next semester.  Each of these courses may count as a Social Science or Philosophy elective, each may count to satisfy credits in the Sustainability Studies minor, and there are no prerequisites for either of them.  All Pratt undergraduates are eligible and encouraged to enroll.

One of these courses focuses on how we power the processes that allow us to create and distribute goods, as well as transport ourselves and enjoy the conveniences of modern life.  We will discuss global climate change, nuclear power, and fracking (among other topics) in SUST 401-01 Power, Pollution, and Profit.  As of this morning, eight seats are still available in the seminar.

SUST 401-01 Power, Pollution, and Profit
Modern society relies on burning fossil fuel for energy, with serious economic, public health, and environmental consequences. Learn the history of how we came to rely on unsustainable energy sources and ways In which our future use of energy may be made mode sustainable.

Spring 2015: Tuesdays, 2pm-4:50pm.  3 credit hours.

I am also leading a team of Pratt Institute faculty teaching SUST 201 The Sustainable Core, which remains open for registration.  This course is designed as our introduction to sustainability, is the required core course for Pratt’s Sustainability Studies minor, and is an excellent way to get familiar with the many ways sustainability is practiced at Pratt.

SUST 201-01 The Sustainable Core
This course provides an overview of sustainability by exploring definitions, controversies, trends, and case-studies in various systems and locales (urban/rural, local/national/global). Investigation of critical elements of sustainability, including environmental history and urban ecology, sustainable development and landscape transformations, recycling/waste management, ecosystem restoration, and environmental justice.

Spring 2015: Mondays, 2pm-4:50pm.  3 credit hours.

Both of these courses may count as a Social Science or Philosophy elective, and there are no prerequisites for either of them. If you are a Pratt student and have any questions for me about these courses (or about the Sustainability Studies minor), please feel free to contact me at czimring@pratt.edu.

Register for Spring 2015 Sustainability Courses at Pratt

How do humans live in concert with the environment?  Discuss this question in these two Fall 2013 courses.

I am offering two Sustainability courses next semester.  Each of these courses may count as a Social Science or Philosophy elective, each may count to satisfy credits in the Sustainability Studies minor, and there are no prerequisites for either of them.  All Pratt undergraduates are eligible and encouraged to enroll.

One of these courses focuses on how we power the processes that allow us to create and distribute goods, as well as transport ourselves and enjoy the conveniences of modern life.  If you are concerned about global climate change, nuclear power, or tracking, consider registering in SUST 401-01 Power, Pollution, and Profit.  The seminar examines the ways industrial society has harnessed energy, what the consequences of our past and present energy uses are, and how we might develop more sustainable practices involving energy.  Here’s a quick summary:

SUST 401-01 Power, Pollution, and Profit
Modern society relies on burning fossil fuel for energy, with serious economic, public health, and environmental consequences. Learn the history of how we came to rely on unsustainable energy sources and ways In which our future use of energy may be made mode sustainable.

Spring 2015: Tuesdays, 2pm-4:50pm.  3 credit hours.

In addition to that seminar, I am leading a team of Pratt Institute faculty teaching SUST 201 The Sustainable Core.  This course is designed as our introduction to sustainability, is the required core course for Pratt’s Sustainability Studies minor, and is an excellent way to get familiar with the many ways sustainability is practiced at Pratt.

SUST 201-01 The Sustainable Core
This course provides an overview of sustainability by exploring definitions, controversies, trends, and case-studies in various systems and locales (urban/rural, local/national/global). Investigation of critical elements of sustainability, including environmental history and urban ecology, sustainable development and landscape transformations, recycling/waste management, ecosystem restoration, and environmental justice.

Spring 2015: Mondays, 2pm-4:50pm.  3 credit hours.

Both of these courses may count as a Social Science or Philosophy elective, and there are no prerequisites for either of them. If you are a Pratt student and have any questions for me about these courses (or about the Sustainability Studies minor), please feel free to contact me at czimring@pratt.edu.

Sustainability Courses Back in Session As Pratt Starts Fall Semester

How do humans live in concert with the environment?  Discuss this question in these two Fall 2013 courses.

How do humans live in concert with the environment? Discuss this question in these two Fall 2014 courses.

Fall term started Monday at Pratt, officially kicking off the second year of the Sustainability Studies minor. The Sustainable Core course is offering two sections. I am leading the Monday 2-4:50pm section and Jen Telesca is leading the Wednesday 5-7:50pm section. Each section includes participation by various Pratt instructors, giving students a sense of how sustainability is approached in design, architecture, the social sciences, the natural sciences, and humanities. This course is designed as our introduction to sustainability, and it is a required course for Pratt’s Sustainability Studies minor.

We deliberately have larger enrollment caps on the core course, so interested students can still sign up for either section. In addition, we have added more elective courses that count toward completion of the minorIf you are a Pratt student and have any questions for me about either of these courses, please feel free to contact me at czimring@pratt.edu.

Seats Available in Pratt’s Sustainable Core (Fall 2014)

As Pratt’s Sustainability Studies minor gets set to celebrate its first anniversary of being in the catalog, the upper-division SUST offerings are enrolled to capacity.  Students interested in developing the environmental dimensions of their education do have options, however. In Fall 2014, for the first time, Pratt’s Sustainable Core course is offering two sections, and both sections currently have some seats available. I am leading the Monday 2-4:50pm section and Jen Telesca is leading the Wednesday 5-7:50pm section. Each section will include participation by various Pratt instructors, giving students a sense of how sustainability is approached in design, architecture, the social sciences, the natural sciences, and humanities. This course is designed as our introduction to sustainability, and it is a required course for Pratt’s Sustainability Studies minor.

SUST 201 The Sustainable Core

This course provides an overview of sustainability by exploring definitions, controversies, trends, and case-studies in various systems and locales (urban/rural, local/national/global). Investigation of critical elements of sustainability, including environmental history and urban ecology, sustainable development and landscape transformations, recycling/waste management, ecosystem restoration, and environmental justice.

Fall 2014: SUST 201-01 Mondays, 2pm-4:50pm; SUST 201-02 Wednesdays 5-7:50pm.  3 credit hours.

This course may count as a Social Science or Philosophy elective, and has no prerequisites. If you are a Pratt student and have any questions for me about either of these courses, please feel free to contact me at czimring@pratt.edu.